219 Rembrandt as eyewitness

The papers are full of long stories on a short letter in the New England Journal of Medicine. The authors, Harvard neurobiologists, claim that his self-portraits contain certain evidence that Rembrandt was wall-eyed and that this had consequences for his artistry. Schwartz begs to differ. The scientists simply ignore a mass of material in which no such aberration is visible, and they fail to notice that similar effects as they observe in Rembrandt portraits can also be seen in self-portaits by others. Continue reading “219 Rembrandt as eyewitness”

213 Walk IV

In 1998, for an exhibition in Amsterdam and Paris, a team of art historians and archivists retraced Rembrandt’s footsteps in six walks in and around Amsterdam. Following the trajectory of Walk IV, on the Amstel River, Schwartz realizes that Rembrandt’s deepest wish was to have Holland all for himself. Continue reading “213 Walk IV”

The Albertina two-thirds out of commission

One of Europe’s greatest historical print collections is turned into an exhibition hall.


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After I win the game I’ll tell you what the rules were, or A new Rembrandt from 1632

A painting that is ignored in the first three volumes of the Corpus of Rembrandt paintings has now been attributed to Rembrandt by the leader of the Rembrandt Research Project. His arguments give Schwartz reason to investigate his methods and ask what criteria should be addressed in judging the authorship of old master paintings. He first tells the story of how the painting was bought and sold since 1970.


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